#MeToo

In the light of this important conversation, I’m grateful for the words of Nicole Stamp. If you’d like to take concrete action to change things, she offers some truly helpful advice like this:

13. Don’t argue so much in conversations around types of oppression that you don’t personally experience. Keep an eye open for our culture’s gross habit of putting the onus on the oppressed persons to dredge up their pain for inspection (only for us to then dismiss it as “just one instance which they probably either caused or misinterpreted anyway”). Instead, try this- if you don’t believe something is an issue, use the Googles. Find, say, three articles *written by people in that demographic*, and read them. Look for patterns in their analyses. You’ll find that these ideas aren’t weird militant fringe notions- oppression is a widely-accepted and statistically-supported phenomenon and a lot of insightful people are talking about it. Avoid the hot takes and go to the source- the people who experience the issue firsthand.

(You can read the whole thing here) I find this particularly relevant to the church. We tend to talk about oppressed and marginalized people but rarely talk to them. Opening our minds to the perspectives of those who are experiencing oppression would go a long way towards a much-needed humbling.

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